Monthly Archives: September 2015

Montana Part I: Miles City

Our route planning for The Lower 48 in 48 Tour is typically pretty loose. This means we have a general direction in which we want to proceed but we don’t make reservations in specific campgrounds too far in advance. This way we can be flexible as we make our way through the country. The general rules are: north in the summers, south in the winters, from east to west. After that, we make it up as we go. In keeping with the North- in- the- summers, south- in- the- winters concept, our general idea had always been to turn south from North Dakota and start our way down through South Dakota, Nebraska, etc. After Mike started studying the map and the calendar, he decided to swing a little farther west when we left North Dakota. It was still September, so the weather was likely to hold out for a while longer before winter started to set in. Montana is a big state with diverse terrain ranging from mountains to plains.  The eastern part of the state is a vast land of grassy plains flanked with a rich native American history. We expect to spend some time next summer in the western part of Montana, but we wanted to see what the other part of the state was like too. We decided to put South Dakota on the back burner for a couple of weeks and visit Miles City. This historic western town had plenty of Indian history along with a proud heritage of cowboys, agriculture and livestock. Plus, Mike could dove hunt for free on public lands… during the times he wasn’t fishing.

Miles City is a legendary western town at he confluence of the Tongue and Yellowstone Rivers. In 1876 Col. Nelson Miles built a Cantonment in the area as a base for battle against hostile Indians in the area. As a result of the military installation, merchants and bar owners started sprouting up to service the soldiers. As the area began to expand with settlers, the soldiers began building Fort Keogh two miles from the original site. Here, many of the free Indians, weary of battle with cavalrymen, would surrender to Col. Miles and accept the reservation lifestyle. Miles City is in Custer County. No coincidence. Custer camped in Miles City only weeks prior to his death 135 miles away in the Battle of Little Big Horn.

We stayed at a KOA Campground. It was small, but nice, clean, quiet and within walking distance to downtown (and to a great fishing spot)! Mike had a great time dove hunting and fishing. I had a great time eating the birds and fish. I spent my time looking at the downtown shops and local museums. Our last two stops had been REALLY cramped, so we spent lots of time enjoying our camp spot again. I read my kindle. We walked the dogs through town. I visited the farmer’s market. Mike had a great time hunting. We had dinner at a couple of downtown restaurants. Mike hit some golf balls at the local golf club. We went to church. It was a nice and peaceful two weeks.

The Yellowstone River flows to the north.

The Yellowstone River flows to the north.

The Yellowstone River is approximately 692 miles long.

The Yellowstone River is approximately 692 miles long.

Flat tire. We were so lucky to discover this development after we were parked. A local tire company came out and took it off to find a huge hole exposing the interior metal of the tire. They couldn't patch it, so they located another one for us in Billings. A couple of days later, they were back out to get us totally situated. Flat tires are no fun and the $864 invoice at the end was not very exciting, but it was all okay because we did not encounter any danger on the road as a result of the puncture. I think this was the most convenient flat tire, ever.

Flat tire. We were so lucky to discover this development after we were parked. A local tire company came out and took it off to find a huge hole exposing the interior metal of the tire. They couldn’t patch it, so they located another one for us in Billings. A couple of days later, they were back out to get us totally situated. Flat tires are no fun and the $864 invoice at the end was not very exciting, but it was all okay because we did not encounter any danger on the road as a result of the puncture. I think this was the most convenient flat tire, ever.

Not only is there LOTS of hay... there are multiple varieties of hay too!

Not only is there LOTS of hay… there are multiple varieties of hay too!

The dove's view of Mike hunting.

The dove’s view of Mike hunting.

Mike's view while dove hunting.

Mike’s view while dove hunting.

A selfie from The Montana Bar.

A selfie from The Montana Bar.

The municipal swimming pool is a natural lake two blocks from downtown!

The municipal swimming pool is a natural lake two blocks from downtown!

College football season started while were at this stop. Mike is happy now. He would probably be a bit more happy if our Longhorns could win a game!

College football season started while were at this stop. Mike is happy now. He would probably be a bit more happy if our Longhorns could win a game!

More fish from the angler. A catfish, a white bass and a sauger. Piper is inspecting the loot.

More fish from the angler. A catfish, a small mouth bass and a sauger. Piper is inspecting the loot.

We were near the trail of Lewis and Clark in this part of the country. Local history says Captain William Clark, Sacagawea, her baby son Pomp, and 22 permanent members of the Corps of Discovery camped here at what is now Pirogue State Park in July of 1806.

We were near the trail of Lewis and Clark in this part of the country. Local history says Captain William Clark, Sacagawea, her baby son Pomp, and 22 permanent members of the Corps of Discovery camped here at what is now Pirogue State Park in July of 1806.

We usually don't get up too early. (For that matter, we usually don't go to bed too late either)! But Mike was up with the sun on most of our days in Miles City. He was drinking coffee in preparation for either dove hunting or fishing... or both.

We usually don’t get up too early. (For that matter, we usually don’t go to bed too late either)! But Mike was up with the sun on most of our days in Miles City. He was drinking coffee in preparation for either dove hunting or fishing… or both.

Some mule deer watching Mike fish from across the Yellowstone River.

Some mule deer watching Mike fish from across the Yellowstone River.

A deer watching Mike hunt for dove.

A deer watching Mike hunt for dove.

Some cream cheese and jalapeno stuffed bacon-wrapped dove fresh off of our grill.

Some cream cheese and jalapeno stuffed bacon-wrapped dove fresh off of our grill.

This is where Mike fished during our time in Miles City. It was at the confluence of the Tongue and Yellowstone Rivers. It was within walking distance of our camp and he always had good luck!

This is where Mike fished during our time in Miles City. It was at the confluence of the Tongue and Yellowstone Rivers. It was within walking distance of our camp and he always had good luck!

More fish from the confluence of the two rivers.

More fish from the confluence of the two rivers.

The back of our spot at the Miles City KOA.

The back of our spot at the Miles City KOA.

Sunset through the 100-year old Cottonwood trees in our campground.

Sunset through the 100-year old Cottonwood trees in our campground.

There is LOTS of hay in this part of the country. I guess they have to stock up for the winter months!

There is LOTS of hay in this part of the country. I guess they have to stock up for the winter months!

The 1880's era Olive Hotel is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A scene from the epic film Lonesome Dove was filmed in one of its rooms.

The 1880’s era Olive Hotel is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A scene from the epic film Lonesome Dove was filmed in one of its rooms.

We happened to be in town during the 28th Annual Classic Car Show hosted by the High Plains Classic Car Club. The entire park was filled with antique cars of all makes, models, and ages.

We happened to be in town during the 28th Annual Classic Car Show hosted by the High Plains Classic Car Club. The entire park was filled with antique cars of all makes, models, and ages.

There are two eagles that are long-time residents of Miles City. George and Martha built a big nest in one of the cottonwood trees in a city park near our campground. They grew out of that original nest and recently constructed a newer model in the same tree. They do leave for a couple of months each year, but they always return to raise their eaglets. They even have their own 24/7 eagle cam. The live feed runs when they are in town. Here is the link: http://53431558b81c6.click2stream.com

There are two eagles that are long-time residents of Miles City. George and Martha built a big nest in one of the cottonwood trees in a city park near our campground. They grew out of that original nest and recently constructed a newer model in the same tree. They do leave for a couple of months each year, but they always return to raise their eaglets. They even have their own 24/7 eagle cam. The live feed runs when they are in town. Here is the link: http://53431558b81c6.click2stream.com

This sign in the museum made me chuckle. A little bit more of a western slant as compared to the tone of southern charm!

This sign in the museum made me chuckle. A little bit more of a western slant as compared to the tone of southern charm!

This longhorn is a native Texan.

This longhorn is a native Texan.

There is a big history between the Native Americans of this region and the white man that invaded the land. This Reconciliation Blanket was given to the people of Miles City in 2008 (only SEVEN years ago) by the Tribal Council of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe.

There is a big history between the Native Americans of this region and the white man that invaded the land. This Reconciliation Blanket was given to the people of Miles City in 2008 (only SEVEN years ago) by the Tribal Council of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe.

This velvet quilt dates to 1720 and came from Sweden. It was also in the Range Riders Museum.

This velvet quilt dates to 1720 and came from Sweden. It was also in the Range Riders Museum.

A month after the defeat of Col. George Custer's troops at Little Big Horn, Congress established an Army post to be built at the confluence of the Tongue and Yellowstone Rivers. Building of the site commenced in August of 1876. The military function of the fort was shut down in 1908 and it became a remount station, providing horses for the military. During WWI, more horses were processed here than at any other U.S. army post. Now Fort Keogh is part of the Department of Agriculture and conducts scientific investigations to improve the sustainability of range beef cattle production and the rangeland on which they live.

A month after the defeat of Col. George Custer’s troops at Little Big Horn, Congress established an Army post to be built at the confluence of the Tongue and Yellowstone Rivers. Building of the site commenced in August of 1876. The military function of the fort was shut down in 1908 and it became a remount station, providing horses for the military. During WWI, more horses were processed here than at any other U.S. army post. Now Fort Keogh is part of the Department of Agriculture and conducts scientific investigations to improve the sustainability of range beef cattle production and the rangeland on which they live.

This photo from the museum cracked me up. Ladies night at Fort Keogh.

This photo from the museum cracked me up. Ladies night at Fort Keogh.

A photo from the Range Riders Museum. This is cowboy and indian territory - for sure.

A photo from the Range Riders Museum. This is cowboy and indian territory – for sure.

The Range Riders Museum near our campground was an amazing museum. This is a log cabin display in one of their 8 buildings.

The Range Riders Museum near our campground was an amazing museum. This is a log cabin display in one of their 8 buildings.

A stage coach at the Rough Riders Museum in Miles City.

A stage coach at the Rough Riders Museum in Miles City.

The bar at the Montana Bar.

The bar at the Montana Bar.

The Montana Bar could quite possibly be the most authentic bar I've ever been into. Dark. Nostalgic. Polished. The stuffed hamburgers were pretty good too!

The Montana Bar could quite possibly be the most authentic bar I’ve ever been into. Dark. Nostalgic. Polished. The stuffed hamburgers were pretty good too!

No Longhorn Network up in Montana. Mike listened to the game on his phone while we were at the sports bar.

No Longhorn Network up in Montana. Mike listened to the game on his phone while we were at the sports bar.

Lots of cool neon after dark in downtown Miles City.

Lots of cool neon after dark in downtown Miles City.

Kevin and his wife had recently purchased the KOA in Miles City (I think they had closed on all the paperwork only one month before we arrived). He was retired from UPS and they moved to Montana from Tennessee. It was fun watching this family becoming familiar with the routines of their endeavor and enjoying the new of every day! We were lucky enough to meet Grandpa too because he came to visit for a few days while we were there.

Kevin and his wife had recently purchased the KOA in Miles City (I think they had closed on all the paperwork only one month before we arrived). He was retired from UPS and they moved to Montana from Tennessee. It was fun watching this family becoming familiar with the routines of their endeavor and enjoying the new of every day! We were lucky enough to meet Grandpa too because he came to visit for a few days while we were there.

Some of the beautiful stained glass inside the historic United Methodist Church.

Some of the beautiful stained glass inside the historic United Methodist Church.

Some of the fresh catch Mike supplied to us during this stop.

Some of the fresh catch Mike supplied to us during this stop.

We had breakfast one morning at the 600 Café in downtown. It was all-60's reunion weekend, and I was able to listen in on lots of interesting conversations while we enjoyed our meal.

We had breakfast one morning at the 600 Café in downtown. It was all-60’s reunion weekend, and I was able to listen in on lots of interesting conversations while we enjoyed our meal.

The Saturday Farmer's Market was located at a park within walking distance of our campground. We bought fresh corn, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and cookies when we visited.

The Saturday Farmer’s Market was located at a park within walking distance of our campground. We bought fresh corn, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and cookies when we visited.

 

 

 

 

North Dakota Part II: Medora

Our second stop in North Dakota was in Medora, an old-west tourist town on I-94 in the southwestern edge of that state, at the gateway to the Badlands. Neither of us knew anything at all about Medora before we got there. As Mike was lining up future reservations for us, he was looking for an RV park west of Bismarck. All of the other parks he looked at were already booked during weekends, so the Red Trail Campground in Medora turned out to be our only option. We are so lucky! I cannot say that the campground itself was in any way spectacular, but the land and scenery around us made up for the drawbacks of the RV park.

Medora was founded in 1883 and is the county seat of Billings County, but it is not really a traditional town. Most of the land and businesses in the center of town are actually owned and operated by the Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation. Almost all of the shops, restaurants, and activities in town are owned and staffed by the Foundation. It is a seasonal community. Each year about 600 people from all over the country come to Medora to work for the summer. That workforce is supplemented by another army of volunteers who come to town and spend a week of their time catering to tourists visiting the area. The Foundation also works very closely with the National Park Service, as Medora serves as the gateway to Teddy Roosevelt National Park.

Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Medora for a buffalo hunt in September of 1883 and immediately fell in love with the land. He invested in cattle and soon operated two large ranches, the Maltese and the Elkhorn. His time in the area and his affinity for the Badlands made him the most famous individual to be intertwined with Medora and its history. Harold Schafer, however, is probably the person most responsible for the evolution of Medora into the attraction it is today. Mr. Schafer was a native of North Dakota and a “rags to riches” businessman. He rose to national acclaim as the original maker of Glass Wax, Snowy Bleach, and Mr. Bubble bubble bath. Do you remember Mr. Bubble in the pink plastic bottle? I do! Harold Schafer is the man that established the Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation in 1986 and set preservation efforts into motion so that Medora would become somewhat of a living history museum – showcasing the lifestyles and physical environment of the western cowboy era.

We spent two fun weeks in Medora. We visited the museums, shops and restaurants. We also took advantage of most of the other entertainment options available to visitors. When we weren’t wandering around the cute little town, we were in the National Park or on one of the other hiking trails in the area. This was our first exposure to the Badlands and the landscape was gloriously beautiful. I will let the pictures below tell the rest of the story.

Although the Keystone Pipeline from Canada to Texas has not yet been officially approved, we have seen yards of pipes ready to go since we were in Duluth, MN. I wonder what will happen with all of this equipment if the construction of the pipeline is ultimately denied?

Although the Keystone Pipeline from Canada to Texas has not yet been officially approved, we have seen yards of pipes ready to go since we were in Duluth, MN. This was a pile of pipe that we passed along I-94. I wonder what will happen with all of this equipment if the construction of the pipeline is ultimately denied?

This is not the greatest photo since it was taken out of the passenger side window as we were driving west across North Dakota, but this is a field of sunflowers. I did not know North Dakota is the largest producer of sunflower crops in the United States. They look so bright and magical as they all face the same direction - like a little army of happy flowers.

This is not the greatest photo since it was taken out of the passenger side window as we were driving west across North Dakota, but this is a field of sunflowers. I did not know North Dakota is the largest producer of sunflower crops in the United States. They look so bright and magical as they all face the same direction – like a little army of happy flowers.

Our first glimpse of the cute town of Medora as we walked to downtown from our campground.

Our first glimpse of the cute town of Medora as we walked to downtown from our campground.

These horses provided tourists with a 30- minute tour of the town as the man with the reins serenaded them with old-timey cowboy songs.

These horses provided tourists with a 30- minute tour of the town as the man with the reins serenaded them with old-timey cowboy songs.

A spectacular national park.

A spectacular national park.

The basic components of any community: the post office, the bank, and the church.

The basic components of any community: the post office, the bank, and the church.

St. Mary's Catholic Church was built in 1884 and financed by the town's namesake Medora de Vallombrosa. Back at that time, she received an annual income of $90,000 from a stock portfolio she received from her father before her marriage. Can you imagine earning an income of $90k over 131 years ago? She was loaded!

St. Mary’s Catholic Church was built in 1884 and financed by the town’s namesake Medora de Vallombrosa. Back at that time, she received an annual income of $90,000 from a stock portfolio she received from her father before her marriage. Can you imagine earning an income of $90k over 131 years ago? She was loaded!

St. Mary's Catholic Church is too small to accommodate 2015 crowds, so now services are held at the Community Center in the City Council Chambers at 4pm on Saturdays. The priest travels from the town of Beach, about 30 miles west of Medora. The historic church is still open to visitors for prayers and lighting of candles.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church is too small to accommodate 2015 crowds, so now services are held at the Community Center in the City Council Chambers at 4pm on Saturdays. The priest travels from the town of Beach, about 30 miles west of Medora. The historic church is still open to visitors for prayers and lighting of candles.

The only road leaving Medora to the south.

The only road leaving Medora to the south.

Medora offers a musical variety show every night of the week during the summer season. We got to the parking lot extra early on the night we saw the production, and had our own little private tailgate party. This was our view from the back of the Honda.

Medora offers a musical variety show every night of the week during the summer season. We got to the parking lot extra early on the night we saw the production, and had our own little private tailgate party. This was our view from the back of the Honda.

Tailgate selfie.

Tailgate selfie.

A view of the badlands as sunset approached.

A view of the Badlands as sunset approached.

While we enjoyed our tailgate party, we were able to watch these two elk graze on top of a hill across from us. (Mike was in heaven)!

While we enjoyed our tailgate party, we were able to watch these two elk graze on top of a hill across from us. (Mike was in heaven)!

The views from The Badlands' hilltops are magical.

The views from the Badlands’ hilltops are magical.

The musical in progress.

The musical in progress.

Did you know prairie dogs live in towns? I did not.

Did you know prairie dogs live in towns? I did not.

Piper and Cessna also thought the scenic views of The Badlands were incredibly majestic.

Piper and Cessna also thought the scenic views of the Badlands were incredibly majestic.

Mike and his dog looking for wildlife.

Mike and his dog looking for wildlife.

Badlands selfie.

Badlands selfie.

Wild mustangs or feral horses off in the distance.

Wild mustangs or feral horses off in the distance.

Buffalo everywhere.

Buffalo everywhere.

The rock formations in The Badlands had me thinking we might have been transported to another planet all together.

The rock formations in the Badlands had me thinking we might have been transported to another planet all together.

Taking it all in during a driving tour of Teddy Roosevelt National Park.

Taking it all in during a driving tour of Teddy Roosevelt National Park.

The public golf course in Medora is called the Bully Pulpit. There were several golf tournaments taking place during our stay, so unfortunately Mike only got to hit balls from the practice range. No tee times available for 18-holes.

The public golf course in Medora is called the Bully Pulpit. There were several golf tournaments taking place during our stay, so unfortunately Mike only got to hit balls from the practice range. No tee times available for 18-holes.

The Maah Daah Hey Trail is a 145 mile non-motorized trail that stretches through the Badlands. Portions of the trail that run through the national park do not allow dogs, but they are allowed outside the park. Piper and Cessna loved our daily hikes.

The Maah Daah Hey Trail is a 145 mile non-motorized trail that stretches through the Badlands. Portions of the trail that run through the national park do not allow dogs, but they are allowed outside the park. Piper and Cessna loved our daily hikes.

One of our daily hikes.

One of our daily hikes.

One of Medora's most famous historic citizens was the man who invented Mr. Bubbles bubble bath. Another was Theodore Roosevelt. There is a performance in the town theater every day at 3:30 when the former president talks to the audience about his life, his philosophies, and his aspirations. It was very interesting and educational.

One of Medora’s most famous historic citizens was the man who invented Mr. Bubbles bubble bath. Another was Theodore Roosevelt. There is a performance in the town theater every day at 3:30 when the former president talks to the audience about his life, his philosophies, and his aspirations. It was very interesting and educational.

The ceiling beams in the Little Missouri Saloon were covered in dollar bills and cowboy hats.

The ceiling beams in the Little Missouri Saloon were covered in dollar bills and cowboy hats.

I've been trying to recall exactly how many 'signed' dollar bills we have left across the country since this adventure started. I can for sure remember tacking them to the walls of watering holes in Pensacola, Rhode Island, and Columbus, Ohio.

I’ve been trying to recall exactly how many ‘signed’ dollar bills we have left across the country since this adventure started. I can for sure remember tacking them to the walls of watering holes in Pensacola, Rhode Island, and Columbus, Ohio.

The only remaining train line that runs through Medora is the BNSF.

The only remaining train line that runs through Medora is the BNSF.

We had our own personal Badlands hill on the outskirts of our campground.

We had our own personal Badlands hill on the outskirts of our campground.

This photo was taken the night before the full moon was up in Medora during our stay. The National Park Service was sponsoring a guided full moon walk /hike in the park on the next night. Unfortunately, the wild fires burning in Montana and Washington were so bad that the smoke darkened any view, so I opted not to go after all.

This photo was taken the night before the full moon was up in Medora during our stay. The National Park Service was sponsoring a guided full moon walk /hike in the park on the next night. Unfortunately, the wild fires burning in Montana and Washington were so bad that the smoke darkened any view, so I opted not to go after all.

Buffalo traffic jam.

Buffalo traffic jam.

The Little Missouri River.

The Little Missouri River.

Medora was founded by a Frenchman named the Marquis de Mores (his wife was named Medora). Their home was a 26-room Chateau constructed during the 1880's. It is still standing and open to the public for self-guided tours. The home features original furnishings and décor. This was the pantry off of the kitchen. Looks like they were ready to host aristocratic hunting parties at any time for any number of guests.

Medora was founded by a Frenchman named the Marquis de Mores (his wife was named Medora). Their home was a 26-room Chateau constructed during the 1880’s. It is still standing and open to the public for self-guided tours. The home features original furnishings and décor. This was the pantry off of the kitchen. Looks like they were ready to host aristocratic hunting parties at any time for any number of guests.

This is the type of thing that we shared the sidewalk with as we walked the dogs around town.

This is the type of thing that we shared the sidewalk with as we walked the dogs around town.

Mike fries us up some fish from our last stop in Valley City.

Mike fries us up some fish from our last stop in Valley City.

As we returned from an afternoon walk, NINE coaches from a caravan were all arriving to check in at the campground.

As we returned from an afternoon walk, NINE coaches from a caravan were all arriving to check in at the campground.

The Pitchfork Steak Fondue takes place each night from 5:30 - 6:30 on an outdoor terrace overlooking the Badlands. Mike had one of the western style steaks. I had a plate of roasted buffalo, grilled chicken and bbq'd ribs. I thought the meal would be mediocre at best, given the number of crowds they serve each night and the orientation toward 'touristy' entertainment. I'm happy to say I was wrong. It was surprisingly good. I later learned this dining experience was featured on the "Best Of" show on Food Network.

The Pitchfork Steak Fondue takes place each night from 5:30 – 6:30 on an outdoor terrace overlooking the Badlands. Mike had one of the western style steaks. I had a plate of roasted buffalo, grilled chicken and bbq’d ribs. I thought the meal would be mediocre at best, given the number of crowds they serve each night and the orientation toward ‘touristy’ entertainment. I’m happy to say I was wrong. It was surprisingly good. I later learned this dining experience was featured on the “Best Of” show on Food Network.

The line for dinner at the Pitchfork Steak Fondue.

The line for dinner at the Pitchfork Steak Fondue.

Three trophy mule deer bucks in the national park. The photo is grainy because I was zoomed in all the way. Mike was salivating.

Three trophy mule deer bucks in the national park. The photo is grainy because I was zoomed in all the way. Mike was salivating.

We got up extra early one morning and took a sunrise drive through the park. The objective was to see as many wild animals as possible as they were out and about at dawn. Our strategy was successful. We saw turkey, white tail deer, mule deer, coyotes, feral horses, bison, birds, prairie dogs and pronghorn.

We got up extra early one morning and took a sunrise drive through the park. The objective was to see as many wild animals as possible as they were out and about at dawn. Our strategy was successful. We saw turkey, white tail deer, mule deer, coyotes, feral horses, bison, birds, prairie dogs and pronghorn.

A single pronghorn at the base of a hill.

A single pronghorn at the base of a hill.

Two mule deer on the side of a mountain. The photo is grainy again because of the zoom factor.

Two mule deer on the side of a mountain. The photo is grainy again because of the zoom factor.

It is almost impossible to see, but I took this photo of a coyote making his way up the side of this mountain.

It is almost impossible to see, but I took this photo of a coyote making his way up the side of this mountain.

Mule deer.

Mule deer.

buck

A momma and her baby.

A momma and her baby.

Only the streets within downtown Medora are paved. All other roads in the area are red gravel.

Only the streets within downtown Medora are paved. All other roads in the area are red gravel.

The amphitheater at the Medora Musical before the evening's audience was seated.

The amphitheater at the Medora Musical before the evening’s audience was seated.

The Maah Daah Hey Trail name comes from the Native American language of the Mandan Hidatsa Indians. It means "grandfather, long-lasting". It is used to describe things or an area that has been or will be around for a long time and is deserving of respect. The trail markers feature a single turtle. Adopted from the Lakota Sioux Indians, the turtle symbolizes patience, determination, steadfastness, long-life and fortitude. The turtle shell symbolizes protection.

The Maah Daah Hey Trail name comes from the Native American language of the Mandan Hidatsa Indians. It means “grandfather, long-lasting”. It is used to describe things or an area that has been or will be around for a long time and is deserving of respect. The trail markers feature a single turtle. Adopted from the Lakota Sioux Indians, the turtle symbolizes patience, determination, steadfastness, long-life and fortitude. The turtle shell symbolizes protection.

A snapshot of the Maah Daah Hey Trail above the Bully Pulpit Golf Course.

A snapshot of the Maah Daah Hey Trail above the Bully Pulpit Golf Course.

Hiking the trail.

Hiking the trail.